Indigenous women's centres in Winnipeg say their supply of natural medicines is short this summer due to Manitoba's drought conditions.

A child holds a bowl with burning sage in a 2016 photo. Sage is used in the practice of smudging, but dry conditions in Manitoba this year mean some groups are having trouble finding it. (Martha Troian/CBC)

A child holds a bowl with burning sage in a 2016 photo. Sage is used in the practice of smudging, but dry conditions in Manitoba this year mean some groups are having trouble finding it. (Martha Troian/CBC)

Indigenous women's centres in Winnipeg say their supply of natural medicines is short this summer due to Manitoba's drought conditions.

The West End Women's Centre says it's in need of prairie sage, which has been difficult to gather in usual picking spots during recent outings.

"It's kind of scary for our medicines. The places we normally go, the medicines are really low," said Jolene Wilson, the co-ordinator for the centre's Restoring the Balance support program, which draws on traditional Indigenous values and teachings.

To read more of this story first reported by CBC News, click here.

 

This content is made available to Free Press readers as part of an agreement with CBC that sees our two trusted news brands collaborate to better cover Manitoba. Questions about CBC content can be directed to talkback@cbc.ca.