ERIKSDALE, Man. -- Manitoba Progressive Conservative Leader Hugh McFadyen stopped in the hotly contested Interlake riding Tuesday afternoon to promise to create 30 new personal-care-home beds in the region.

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Manitoba Progressive Conservative Leader Hugh McFadyen was on the campaign trail in Eriksdale Tuesday.

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Manitoba Progressive Conservative Leader Hugh McFadyen was on the campaign trail in Eriksdale Tuesday.

ERIKSDALE, Man. -- Manitoba Progressive Conservative Leader Hugh McFadyen stopped in the hotly contested Interlake riding Tuesday afternoon to promise to create 30 new personal-care-home beds in the region.

Standing outside a hospital in the northern Interlake town, McFadyen pledged to spend $7.5 million on Interlake care-home spots if the Manitoba Tories assume power on Oct. 4.

McFadyen claimed the governing New Democrats have failed to prepare for Manitoba's aging population.

Shortly before his pledge, the NDP campaign released a statement claiming the Progressive Conservatives cut the budget for Eriksdale's hospital by 15 per cent in the 1990s. McFadyen was an advisor to the Tory government of the time.

Interlake, where Tom Nevakshonoff has represented the NDP for 12 years, is in play this year because the largely rural riding is among the most flood-affected in Manitoba.

Tory Steve Lupky is attempting to unseat Nevakshonoff, who came under fire earlier this year for suggesting Manitoba flood victims are better off than natural disaster victims elsewhere.

Manitoba NDP leader Greg Selinger visited Interlake on Monday.

The riding is infamous for being the site of a failed 1995 Tory attempt to split the vote, a scandal that helped Gary Filmon's government go down to defeat in 1999.